COMPLIANCE, SECURITY AND GOVERNMENT REGULATION Can your business stay current?

compliance

In this time of IT security breaches, businesses of all sizes have become aware of the consequences of not having a solid IT framework and security policy. What previously was a concern for only large enterprises has now become a challenge all businesses share. Government regulation, such as the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), have mandated compliance for the security of Protected Health Information (PHI) for any size of enterprise that stores PHI. A recent trend has been for large enterprise to relay their compliance and security requirements downstream to their suppliers which may be smaller businesses. One of the initial causes for this was the Target breach. Target, who was fully compliant with their regulatory environment,[1] (PCI DSS), was breached through an HVAC vendor. This Target business partner was primarily responsible for compromising credit card information for millions of its customers and causing large scale damage to Target’s finances and reputation. To learn more about the total cost of a data breach please see my previous article: https://twoearsonemouth.net/2017/11/22/preparing-for-the-cost-of-a-data-breach/ .

In addition to government regulation, industry associations have aligned to create a compliance standard for their data. One primary example of this is the PCI DSS previously mentioned above in regard to Target. PCI DSS develops a robust payment card data security process — including prevention, detection and appropriate reaction to security incidents. The PCI Security Standards Council originates the standards for compliance to all credit card information as well as an approved list of assessors who audit and validate an entity’s adherence to PCI DSS.

Businesses are not completely on their own to navigate through this complex regulatory and IT security environment. There have been a series of IT frameworks developed that an organization can use to reach their goals. These frameworks describe IT “best practices” which are written in general terms. Typically, businesses use them as a reference to achieve regulatory or security compliance. Below are some examples of the most common IT frameworks available today:

  • COBIT– A framework designed by Information Systems Audit and Control Association (ISACA) to provide management and business process owners with an IT governance model that aids in delivering value from IT and understanding the management of risk associated with IT.
  • ISO 27002– An IT security standard originated and maintained by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electro Technical Commission. (IEC)
  • ISO 38500– Similar framework to ISO 27002 for IT used by management and originated and maintained by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and the International Electro Technical Commission. (IEC)

IT security best practices at the highest level can be classified in 3 categories; physical safeguards, administrative safeguards and technical safeguards. Below is a brief description of each.

Physical Safeguards are tools such as alarm systems (video), key card systems, secure locks for offices and drawers where laptops and phones are stored, a guard or receptionist always at the front door and a secure IT server room.

Administrative Safeguards are processes that include creating a security officer and/or department, creating training programs to make all employees aware of what data needs to be protected and how it is protected, a company policy for storing and archiving of protected data and business continuity policies.

Technical Safeguards are IT tools such as Unified Threat Management (UTM) and Next-Gen firewalls, malware and virus protection software on servers and workstations, encryption of data in transit and at rest and a strong Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery (BCDR) plan that is tested on a regular basis.

Following these principles and best practices not only help to achieve a business mitigate risk  but also make good business sense.

 

Contact us so that we may learn more about the IT challenges within your organization. We will provide an initial consult at no cost! We can provide best in class IT Project Management in Cincinnati or remotely.

Jim Conwell (513) 227-4131      jim.conwell@outlook.com      www.twoearsonemouth.net

[1] PCI DSS is an acronym for Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard. PCI DSS is an industry based regulatory authority for the credit card industry.

above image courtesy of RF IDeas

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